Color and File Guide

Bleed and Safe Area

We require that you extend any images that run up to the trim line a minimum of 1/8" (0.125") past the trim line to create "bleed". Depending on what program you use to create your file, this may or may not change the total image area of your file. Programs like Photoshop that do not allow the creation of "bleed" or the addition of crop marks will require an image area that is 1/4" (0.25") larger than your desired final overall image area in both dimensions.

Safe Area is the 1/8" (0.125") area inside the trim line. Do not put critical information or images within the Safe Area. This is to prevent minor cutting variations from leaving unintended results at the trim edge. If you choose to make less than this minimum clearance, we will NOT be responsible for items that are cut off in this area.

 

What Resolution Should My File Be?

Low resolution files may be printed as is or will be placed on hold until we receive new files, slowing your turn-around.

These are 72 DPI low res images

These are the same images but at 300 DPI

 

What color mode should my files be?

If you send us an RGB file, there is a chance that a color shift may occur and you may not be satisfied with your job.

These colors are in RGB

These are the same colors but in CMYK

 

How can I avoid transparency issues?

Any transparency issue can be resolved before saving your file.

To prevent this, never use shadows, glows, or any other transparency (image or otherwise) on top of a spot color. Always convert your spot color to CMYK and flatten before sending.

 

What is overprint, and how can it ruin my file?

Primarily used to intentionally overlap inks for a number of reasons, overprint can cause unexpected results. We suggest that you turn all overprint objects off before submitting your files.

In this case the logo was set to overprint. The colors from logo are mixing with the colors from the background. Unexpected results may occur if you have accidentally set certain objects to overprint. Always check logos and other artwork before submitting.

 

How should I set up a Spot UV job?

 

How should I set up a Spot UV job for Silk Laminate?

Use 100% K to indicate where you would like the UV. White will indicate no UV.
REMEMBER "IF IT'S WHITE, YOU CAN WRITE!"

 

How do I export a .pdf correctly?

When exporting from any program such as Indesign or Illustrator, use these settings to make sure your .PDF files export correctly.

 

How do I get a grayscale image in a CMYK document?

Grayscale images that are converted to CMYK will have a color shift in the final print. That shift may be green or yellow.

Always check the CMYK values of your grayscale in the final CMYK document. If there are other values other than K in your grayscale image, there is a chance that the color will vary.
To eliminate all values other than K, use your Channel Mixer (adjustment layer) in Photoshop, then click "Monochrome" and adjust accordingly.

 

What is rich black and how can I get it?

Rich black is an ink mixture of solid black, 100% K, with additional CMY ink values. This results in a darker tone than black ink alone. If you print black alone as 100% K, the resulting black may not be as dark as you might like.

We recommend using
C 60 M 40 Y 40 K 100
This will give you a deep, dark, rich black.